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What You Would Do in a Clutch Situation


In the following news story, which was soon after the fatal bear attack we have an example of cowardice, of abject unmanliness. But there was more, lack of visualization.

A professional hunting guide working for an outfitter takes an out-of-state hunter into grisly country on a bow hunt, where they wound an elk and leave the search for the body until morning. The hunt has already spiraled into misfortune and unprofessionalism. The guide and hunter then return, unarmed, to recover the kill just as two grisly bears have the same idea. In the three years I have known my hiking guide he has told me over and over again that grizzly bears are a vicious, protected species that can only be reliably stopped at close range with the most devastating trench-clearing shotgun round and that even then, dealing with a “griz” without a good dog is very dicey.

Abandoning common wisdom, apparently for his client, the guide ended up being attacked by a bear as the client escaped. Te client said he “threw” his pistol, which he recovered from his pack, to the man who was being mauled and then ran. The only way that 9mm pistols stop the bear is sticking it in his ear. The guide was as good as dead after the client elected not to help him combat the bear. The client flew back home as soon as the body was recovered.

The guide left five children and a wife.

My guide and I began criticizing the client and then caught ourselves, knowing that if any normal, civilized, modern, TV-watching American had been listening in, they would have said, “but you can never know what you will do in a situation you haven’t been in.”

This is one of our most powerful emasculating myths.

Even as an 11-year-old, I had decided what was going to do the first time I got into the boxing ring, and 2 years later I did just that.

As an 18-year-old I had made up my mind that I would never hand over my wallet to a mugger, and when I was called upon to do so, I did not.

I knew my mind, knew what I would make myself do.

Hardly a man in any army going to war has been in battle, yet, when they get there, among good armies, at least an effective portion of those soldiers do their duty, as visualized, before they were in battle.

Not all men have the mental strength to be conditioned, or condition themselves, to face danger, to overcome their terror. But some men do. The myth of “You Can’t Know What you Will Do” goes counter to all combat training I’ve engaged in and is proved wrong by the many tight spots I’ve found myself in.

Indeed, right in the report of the attack is the answer. The guide did not let his client get killed, or even harmed. We are told that no man can have hero in his heart, yet 50% of those men did.

It is well known that strong and regular visualizations are duplicated even quicker than the will to do so by trained combatants, combatants who know that they will do this and will not do that.

Beyond this aspect there is the deeper implication of this bit of profoundly baseline common American wisdom, that since you can’t know that you will stand against this or that until this or that rears its head, than no oath of honor, no promise to stand by your buddy, in front of your wife, behind your leader, may be tendered. The idea behind this deeply America ideal, this thoroughly modern slice of stock wisdom, is that honor is impossible.

The video at the bottom seems to have a better take on this incident. It is amazing that propaganda tells us that bear mace will take care of bears, yet I have seen dozens of cases of men being maced and not flinching—soft, civilized men—and of men being tased and shocked numerous times and just shaking it off. One video has a man tased twice, beaten by two cops—who he then defeats, and then hit with shotgun pellets as he guns the cops down, and he drives off. I don’t know anything about bears, but I know that mace and tasers designed to stop men does not work against determined men, and a grizzly bear is quite possibly tougher than a human criminal.

Do not that neither bear was an adult male.

Otherwise, any protected species will get hyper-aggressive when it knows it is not under threat, like the Harm City Hoodrats, for instance. In cities like Baltimore, citizen self-defense is against the law, just as defense against grizzlies may be punished upon investigation in an opposite kind of wilderness. Only the police or fish and game authorities are permitted lethal force against predation.

Bear Attack

https://www.jhnewsandguide.com/this_just_in/article_fb78dcc0-94a9-5dab-804d-23991c46f90c.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOQAhKrOOww

Hunting Grizzly Video

https://youtu.be/6l_34fVG-O8

Thought Crimes: Against the Goddess

http://jameslafond.blogspot.com/p/combat.html

http://jameslafond.blogspot.com/p/survival.html

Brian Jewell's Latest Blog Post

https://sifujewell.wordpress.com/2018/08/20/the-paradox-of-non-violence-in-the-martial-arts/

Add Comment
Sam J.October 12, 2018 9:03 PM UTC

"...the guide ended up being attacked by a bear as the client escaped. Te client said he “threw” his pistol, which he recovered from his pack, to the man who was being mauled and then ran. The only way that 9mm pistols stop the bear is sticking it in his ear. The guide was as good as dead after the client elected not to help him combat the bear..."

I don't blame that guy for leaving at all. The guide is supposed to know what he's doing, hence the name guide, and went to a grizzly infested area where they had stockpiled with food with no guns sufficient for the process. He could have got them both killed. It's the guides fault for putting them in this situation. The client probably knows not one damn thing about dealing with grizzlies. Since a 9mm is of no use stopping the grizzly what was he supposed to have done? Hit it with a stick?

Bravery is a fine thing but there's a very thin line between bravery and stupidity. If he would have rushed the grizzly to get him off the guide the huge, massive, odds would be that he was eaten also. This would have done no one any good.

And there's the old saying that if charged by a bear you don't need to outrun the bear just the other guy. This being a confirmation of this.
responds:October 13, 2018 7:21 AM UTC

I submit that the death of the coward would have done our genome some good.
BobOctober 9, 2018 5:53 AM UTC

It's lucky bears don't wear calf socks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcNTxZv8rhU
BobOctober 9, 2018 5:30 AM UTC

Great clip by a great guy.

Doesn't matter because bears only eat whites. Imagine if there were a ghetto grizzly explosion.