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Was Columbus Faked?
Lynn Lockhart Cues the Crackpot on the Genoan Upstart
"You know there are people out there that are pushing the idea that Columbus did not exist and that his discovery was a hoax. There is also the question of why there wasn't previous disease die-offs in Pre-Columbian America."
-Lynn, 9/25/21

I am a conspiracy theorist. I can also appreciate, that since American history is largely a crime of concealment rather than a science of revelation, and that the academic, political and medical establishments routinely lie, that some people are moved to thinking everything is a lie.
I am not one of these people. I look for the path of least resistance and maximum gravity when it comes to charting the vast Holy Lie that is America. Columbus was not invented in retrospect. Columbus has been misrepresented as the only mariner to sail from Europe to the Americas before 1493. There is overwhelming evidence for sporadic European-Amerindian contact over most of the Holocene, from about 5,000 B.C. onward. The establishment constructed the lie of America, primarily by omission and by semantic reconditioning of terms. For instance, as you informed me in this conversation that the medical establishment ahs altered medical definitions to fit Shamdemic economics into the fake construct that is science, the changing of word meanings provided roughly half of the concealment of reality. The focus on only very narrow events and the refusal to discuss other events provided, in my estimation, the other portion of what is a very sloppy coverup of the past.
The pre-condition for this successful gaslighting, that enslaves the minds of the masses and drives the inquisitive minority into madness, is the presence of a priesthood of experts, of doctors who enforce doctrine under the pretense of investigation.
For instance, many conspiracy theorists think that the U.S. government does not kill anybody, that they use TV production teams to fake events like the shooting of some dumb red-headed female protestor. Why go to that trouble and generate a dozen or more loose ends that will have to be silenced when you could just have a Bantu cop shoot the bitch and not prosecute the goon that did it?
In my estimation Columbus had roughly a half dozen solid sources for knowing that he could reach a land across a few thousand miles of ocean, when the current "science" made it clear that he would have to sale three times that distance to hit Japan:
-An Italian shipwreck in 1390 or so which resulted in a well-known Venetian mariner partnering with Sir Henry Sinclair in a well-documented trading Voyage to Vinland.
-His 1472 shipwreck and subsequent stay on Iceland, from where regular voyages to and from Vinland had been conducted as late as the 1370s.
-Familiarity with Basque fishing expeditions to Vinland and the westward migration of codfish to the Grand Banks Fishery.
-The theories of an eccentric Italian mathematician with who he was associated.
-His mystical belief in redemption being found with the setting sun.
-Plato's story of Atlantis, as Plato was a much admired figure of the Italian literate class.
There are also many other possibilities, such as the fact that he was a member of The Knights of Christ, a Templar branch who had a tradition that the persecuted Knights Templar escaped the wrath of the European Church and Nobility by sailing west...
As for disease trace, the following pre-Columbian population crashes occurred in the New World, just off the top of my head, roughly between A.D. 900 and 1400:
-Mayan, Meso-America
-Chimu, a Peruvian folk with bronze technology
-Toltec, Mexico
-Chaco Canyon, American Southwest
-Cahokia, Illinois and the unexplained presence of bubonic plague among great plains rodents just across the Mississippi River
There was also the earlier vanishing of the Olmec.
It is well known that carvings of horses and some 33 European languages, including Hebrew in Ohio and Tennessee, Ogam all over Appalachia and even Minoan in the Great Lakes, have been found in the Americas as well as traces of cocaine and tobacco in Egypt.
The five events detailed above occurred during the Medieval Warm Period and the early years of the Little Ice Age. The warm period brought extensive nautical exploration and development of trade routes. The Ice Age that followed permitted the diseases positioned to follow those trade routes to spread with devastating effect due to severe malnutrition among crowded grain-based civilizations. The evidence is for abandonment of population centers, suggestive of disease rather than conquest.
In my opinion, Christobol was an exploitive genius that has been used by academics—whose business is generally hiding under color of revealing the past—as a curtain to obscure the very nautical knowledge he had amassed in his greedy crusade to become Admiral of the Ocean Sea.
Below are some relative links, not including evidence of tropical parasites from China among Native Americans. The hot peppers of Southeast Asia came from South America. Interesting is the fact that Amerindian legends of their origins among sunken islands, or sailing down the Saint Lawrence Seaway, of a bearded messiah sailing off into the east and promising to return are all explained away by academics. The vast archeological evidence, when examined by rogue academics, such as Doctor Fell, whose paperback book from the 1970s now costs over $900, are simply memory-holed by the Gatekeepers of Holy Ignorance.
In short, with a cover up that is so sloppy that this weird novelist has been able to sort through the mess and write a dozen books on European slavery in North America, I see no reason to concoct an elaborate conspiracy for the fabrication of a person out of thin air. Rather the academic practice is focused on omission and distortion of facts.
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